DARWIN ABORIGINAL ART FAIR AND FASHION SHOW

I have been attending Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair periodically since it's inception some 11 years ago and it just keeps getting bigger and better ! A not to be missed event on Darwin's jam packed social and events' calendar early August each year, the Art Fair showcases work from around 50 Art Centres. The diversity of work, be it painterly, sculptural, textiles or fashion is ever increasing and of amongst the most spectacular. So much to see and do in fabulous Darwin over August, but do not miss the Art Fair and Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Award finalists and winning art works showing at the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory.

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 Waringarri Dancers opened the Fair in style and cuteness.

Waringarri Dancers opened the Fair in style and cuteness.

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 Milimginbi Art and Culture, home to master weavers. In the foreground is Margaret Rarru's spectacular Gunga Bathi Madonna (double breasted) basket which was also a highlight of the Fashion Show and now in our Collection. Margaret's work is held in several galleries, museums and notably has a significant collection within the National Gallery of Victoria. Margaret's sister, pictured here showing her technique, is also an extremely talented weaver.

Milimginbi Art and Culture, home to master weavers. In the foreground is Margaret Rarru's spectacular Gunga Bathi Madonna (double breasted) basket which was also a highlight of the Fashion Show and now in our Collection. Margaret's work is held in several galleries, museums and notably has a significant collection within the National Gallery of Victoria. Margaret's sister, pictured here showing her technique, is also an extremely talented weaver.

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 Such a wide array of textiles and designs from Merrepen Arts, Babbarra Women's Centre, Injalak Arts and Crafts amongst others. A stunningly broad choice of fabric, designs and colour made it almost impossible to choose.

Such a wide array of textiles and designs from Merrepen Arts, Babbarra Women's Centre, Injalak Arts and Crafts amongst others. A stunningly broad choice of fabric, designs and colour made it almost impossible to choose.

 Soft sculpture from Yarrenyty Artlere Artists, gems. Originally established in 2000 as a response to the chronic social issues faced by the town camp, Yarrenyty Arltere Town Camp Artists started as an arts training project. In 2002 the community identified the enterprise as a goal and in 2008 the enterprise was established.  Now a vibrant and dynamic hub, Yarrenyty Arltere Artists is seen as an important part in rebuilding strength in the community and creating economic access for people, many of whom had not been engaged previously in the workforce.                                2012 HIGHLY COMMENDED TELSTRA 3D AWARD , WINNER 2013 TELSTRA 3D AWARD ,        2013 HIGHLY COMMENDED WA INDIGENOUS ART AWARD , WINNER 2015 TELSTRA 3D AWARD, WINNER 2016 VINCENT LINGIARI ART AWARD.

Soft sculpture from Yarrenyty Artlere Artists, gems. Originally established in 2000 as a response to the chronic social issues faced by the town camp, Yarrenyty Arltere Town Camp Artists started as an arts training project. In 2002 the community identified the enterprise as a goal and in 2008 the enterprise was established.  Now a vibrant and dynamic hub, Yarrenyty Arltere Artists is seen as an important part in rebuilding strength in the community and creating economic access for people, many of whom had not been engaged previously in the workforce.                                2012 HIGHLY COMMENDED TELSTRA 3D AWARD , WINNER 2013 TELSTRA 3D AWARD ,        2013 HIGHLY COMMENDED WA INDIGENOUS ART AWARD , WINNER 2015 TELSTRA 3D AWARD, WINNER 2016 VINCENT LINGIARI ART AWARD.

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 Tjanpi Desert Weavers is a not-for-profit social enterprise of Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Women’s Council (NPYWC), an Aboriginal governed and directed Corporation.   NPYWC members created Tjanpi (meaning ‘grass’) to enable women on the NPY Lands to earn a regular income from selling their fibre art. More than 300+ Aboriginal women artists from 28 remote communities in the western and central deserts of Australia come together on country to create beautiful, intricate and whimsical fibre art. Tjanpi provides one of the few opportunities for self-initiated income on the NPY Lands and brings Aboriginal women together on country to collect grass, sculpt and weave, sing and dance and keep culture strong.                                   Made primarily from a combination of native desert grasses, seeds and feathers, commercially bought raffia (sometimes dyed with native plants), string and wool, Tjanpi artworks are unique, innovative and constantly evolving. Tjanpi has an extensive exhibition program and is represented in national and international public and private art collections.                                                         In 2005 Tjanpi was awarded the 22nd Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award for their collaborative piece, Tjanpi grass Toyota, made by 18 women from Papulankutja.   

Tjanpi Desert Weavers is a not-for-profit social enterprise of Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Women’s Council (NPYWC), an Aboriginal governed and directed Corporation.   NPYWC members created Tjanpi (meaning ‘grass’) to enable women on the NPY Lands to earn a regular income from selling their fibre art. More than 300+ Aboriginal women artists from 28 remote communities in the western and central deserts of Australia come together on country to create beautiful, intricate and whimsical fibre art. Tjanpi provides one of the few opportunities for self-initiated income on the NPY Lands and brings Aboriginal women together on country to collect grass, sculpt and weave, sing and dance and keep culture strong.                                   Made primarily from a combination of native desert grasses, seeds and feathers, commercially bought raffia (sometimes dyed with native plants), string and wool, Tjanpi artworks are unique, innovative and constantly evolving. Tjanpi has an extensive exhibition program and is represented in national and international public and private art collections.                                                         In 2005 Tjanpi was awarded the 22nd Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award for their collaborative piece, Tjanpi grass Toyota, made by 18 women from Papulankutja.   

 The sell-out fashion show featured Miss World Finalist Magnolia Maymuru showcasing a breathtaking collection from our very best indigenous designers and fabric makers.

The sell-out fashion show featured Miss World Finalist Magnolia Maymuru showcasing a breathtaking collection from our very best indigenous designers and fabric makers.

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